National “I Love Honey Day”

I’m not sure how serious this is, but someone somewhere has declared December 18 to be national I Love Honey Day.  I’m not sure what we’re supposed to do. But here’s an idea: Go out and buy some honey.

Even if you make your own honey (and who doesn’t these days?), you should consider buying some honey. You’d want to look for something unusual, of course. Maybe you live in a dark honey area but one of your friends has produced some nice water-white stuff. Perhaps from fireweed or sweet clover. Or perhaps you don’t make comb honey but you can get some from a nearby market. The point is, you can try something different while encouraging a local beekeeper. From the sample, you can critique the jar and its label while you inhale the honey’s aroma.

If – due to principle or poverty – you can’t or won’t buy another’s honey, then celebrate the day with a bit of your own stuff. Or you could just think about honey. Have you ever held a spoonful of honey and just dripped it all on the floor, then sponged it up and threw it into your compost bin? Probably not. Well, here’s your chance. It will surely get you thinking about the lovely sticky stuff.

If you are totally at a loss for celebration ideas, then just kick back and enjoy Herb Albert’s brassy Taste of Honey – it was number one on the charts on this day back in 1965. And it’s such a sweet song.

About Ron Miksha

Ron Miksha is a geophysicist who also does a bit of science writing and blogging. Ron has worked as a radio broadcaster, a beekeeper, and is based in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. He has written two books, dozens of magazine and journal articles, and complements his first book, Bad Beekeeping, with a popular blog at www.badbeekeepingblog.com. Ron wrote his most recent book, The Mountain Mystery, for everyone who has looked at a mountain and wondered what miracles of nature set it upon the landscape. For more about Ron, including some cool pictures taken when he was a teenager, please check Ron's site: miksha.com.
This entry was posted in Culture, or lack thereof, Honey, Humour and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

9 Responses to National “I Love Honey Day”

  1. Pingback: National “I Love Honey Day” | Beginner Beekeeper

  2. Erik says:

    Great song, hadn’t hear that in many years. Thank you. Very smooth.

    If we are to have a honey day, it should be more local. Maybe “Canadian Honey Day” up in your neck of the woods, or a “Local Honey Day” more broadly. Most folks probably confuse what they find in the grocery stores with real, raw, local honey. So if we’re to have a day, let’s highlight that aspect of the discussion.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. susan rudnicki says:

    Loved it! Had to laugh at the smattering of buxom young ladies decorating the set, something we would not likely see now—they would be playing the instruments, such as Alison Balsom and the many other high level female brass players in the world now.
    Another honey themed song I love is Van Morrison’s “Tupelo Honey” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eq3YLhtuzTQ

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    • Ron Miksha says:

      I found the smattering of sixties girls in the video a bit funny, too! I chose Herb’s Taste of Honey for today’s post because it was apparently topping the charts on December 18 (1965). But my all-time favourite honey song is definitely Van Morrison’s. (I also loved the movie of the same name which came out years after the song.) Thanks for sharing the link to Tupelo Honey!

      Like

  4. Pingback: National “I Love Honey Day” | Raising Honey Bees

  5. Emily Scott says:

    “due to principal or poverty” – do you mean “principle or poverty”? (Sorry!)

    Like

    • Ron Miksha says:

      Yikes! Thanks… funny spellcheck didn’t pick it up. I’ll edit it before another Brit points out that the hillbillies out in the colonies are only bearly semi-literate! 🙂

      Like

      • Emily Scott says:

        Ha! Sorry, pedantic Brit here. Technically it wasn’t a misspelling, as you could have been referring to a high school principal or the grand supreme principal beekeeper.

        Like

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