A Lite Harvest from the FlowHive Super

I’ve tried to learn how the Flow(TM)Hive frame/system has been working for normal beekeepers. Less experienced beekeepers are sometimes extremely happy with it (until they try it) or they report leaking or other issues (which perhaps would be avoided by more experienced folks). This blog gives an honest account of one of the most obvious problems with the solid plastic fully drawn comb – bees are very reluctant to use it unless they are jammed for space (then they might swarm).

Adventures of a beekeeper

After months and months and after harvesting almost 100 pounds from regular supers, I finally got a little honey from my FlowHive super. I didn’t have the full set-up, just the frames to collect honey stores. I put my FlowHive super on a strong hive in March, just before the first nectar flow. In Central Texas, the spring nectar flow can be really hit or miss, but this year was incredible. The hive with this super started as a double-queen set-up, then, when I separated the boxes in April, this hive was deep with a medium.

They quickly outgrew the deep and medium set-up, so I moved to a double deep and moved the queen excluder to below the medium. After the last of the brood hatched from the medium box of frames, I moved it ABOVE the FlowHive super. That was the first indication of what the bees…

View original post 333 more words

About Ron Miksha

Ron Miksha is a geophysicist who also does a bit of science writing and blogging. Ron has worked as a radio broadcaster, a beekeeper, and is based in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. He has written two books, dozens of magazine and journal articles, and complements his first book, Bad Beekeeping, with a popular blog at www.badbeekeeping.com. Ron wrote his most recent book, The Mountain Mystery, for everyone who has looked at a mountain and wondered what miracles of nature set it upon the landscape. For more about Ron, including some cool pictures taken when he was a teenager, please check Ron's site: miksha.com.
Gallery | This entry was posted in Hives and Combs, Reblogs and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s